The Journey by John A. Heldt

And we’re back!

I’m planning on posting Tuesday and Friday from this point forward, although there may occasionally be a post on another day. Especially as I need to catch up on reviews. The hiatus was nice, but it’s good to be back. 🙂

Title: The Journey

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: Northwest Passage, #2

Genre: Science Fiction (time travel romance/adventure)

Era: contemporary and 1979

Setting: Unionville, Oregon, United States

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: from the author (in exchange for an honest review)

Overall Rating: 5/5 stars

THE JOURNEY BY JOHN A. HELDT

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Seattle, 2010. When her entrepreneur husband dies in an accident, Michelle Preston Richardson, 48, finds herself childless and directionless. She yearns for the simpler days of her youth, before she followed her high school sweetheart down a road that led to limitless riches but little fulfillment, and jumps at a chance to reconnect with her past at a class reunion. But when Michelle returns to Unionville, Oregon, and joins three classmates on a spur-of-the-moment tour of an abandoned mansion, she gets more than she asked for. She enters a mysterious room and is thrown back to 1979.

Distraught and destitute, Michelle finds a job as a secretary at Unionville High, where she guides her spirited younger self, Shelly Preston, and childhood friends through their tumultuous senior year. Along the way, she meets widowed teacher Robert Land and finds the love and happiness she had always sought. But that happiness is threatened when history intervenes and Michelle must act quickly to save those she loves from deadly fates. Filled with humor and heartbreak, THE JOURNEY gives new meaning to friendship, courage, and commitment as it follows an unfulfilled soul through her second shot at life.

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Nyssa Glass and the Caper Crisis by H.L. Burke

Title: Nyssa Glass and the Caper Crisis

Series: Nyssa Glass, #0.5

Author: H.L. Burke

Genre: steampunk (science fiction)

Age Range: upper middle grade/young adult

Overall Rating: 4 stars

Nyssa Glass and the Caper Crisis by H.L. Burke

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Orphaned cat burglar Nyssa Glass intends to outwit her rotten fate.

“Adopted” by her incarcerated uncle’s gang of thieves, she breaks into homes and picks pockets to repay her family debt and one day buy her freedom from their dark enterprise. Mechanically adept and determined, Nyssa longs to attend Miss Pratchett’s School for Mechanically Minded Maids and make an honest life she can take pride in.

She wasn’t made to steal things. She was made to create and fix them.

However, before she can make her escape, the head of the gang taps her for a new assignment, one her conscience cannot bear. Nyssa is faced with a heartrending decision: sacrifice everything or become the very thing she’s desperate to escape.

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Mercer Street by John A. Heldt

Title: Mercer Street

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: American Journey, #2

Genre: Time Travel Romance (Science Fiction)

Era: contemporary and 1938 (pre-WW2)

Setting: United States (Princeton, New Jersey)

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: from author (in exchange for honest review)

Overall Rating: 3/5 stars (1 star removed for content)

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The Remnant by William Michael Davidson

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Today I’m taking a break from the blog tour of The New Diary to participate in the blog tour of The Remnant by William Michael Davidson. This tour is being hosted by MC Blog Tours.

Onto the review!

Title: The Remnant

Author: William Michael Davidson

Genre: Christian Dystopian/Science Fiction

Setting: Semi-futuristic United States

Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press

Source: from author (in exchange for honest review)

Overall Rating: 5/5 stars

The Remnant by William Michael Davidson

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Colton Pierce apprehends Abberants—those who display symptoms of faith—and quarantines them on a remote island to ensure public safety.  Years prior, the government released a genetically-engineered super flu that destroyed the genes believed to be the biological source of spiritual experience in an effort to rid the world of terrorism. As an extractor with the Center for Theological Control, Colton is dedicated to the cause.

          But Colton’s steadfast commitment is challenged when he learns his own son has been targeted for extraction. An underground militia, the Remnant, agrees to help Colton save his son in exchange for his assistance with their plan to free the Aberrants on the island.

Colton is faced with the most important decision of his life. Remain faithful to the CTC? Or give up everything to save his son?

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I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect when I started reading this book. I was a little wary, as I’ve never read a novel like this before. Of course, it is pretty original, so I’d probably be hard-pressed to find another book like it.

I loved it (and you can see by my rating), and I’d definitely recommend to anyone … even people who, like myself, are skeptical of this genre.

Plot {4/5}:

I removed one point because it got off to a slow start. I was hardly able to make my way through part one. However, after that, it quickly sped up and became, well, amazing. My favorite scene was in the Mourning Room when Selma talked to Colton. I also enjoyed everything about downloading the virus, because I find that idea intriguing, and also when Selma tells Colton about ‘Gus.’

Characters {5/5}:

The characters were all vividly portrayed and easy to keep track of. I especially liked Selma and Colton (more specifically, them together – they made a great team, honestly).

Selma was a unique, interesting individual. She’s intriguing, and she stands up for herself while still being womanly.

Colton is a pretty cool guy. I totally got his motivations and understood why he did what he did. I also sympathize with him about Marty. Though I’m good with kids (unlike Colton …), I can’t stand signs of weakness. It just bugs me. I’m like, “So what if you fell down and broke your arm? Get up!”

Ashton deserves to die. Hopefully there will be a sequel featuring the tragic death of one Ashton. 😉 Seriously, though, I hate him sooo much!

And ‘Gus’ was amazing, of course. 😛

Setting {3/5}:

Probably the weakest part of the book. Although it is futuristic, not a lot has changed. Sure, there are some technological advancements (such as the ability to, you know, plant a chip in someone’s head and keep tabs on them …), but the characters in this book use the same cars we do (albeit battery-operated) and not many social changes seem to have taken place.

For instance, Colton mentally refers to Ashton as feminine. Would they really even care enough to point that out in the post-2060 world? I don’t think so. It’s all going downhill, especially if religion is banned! 😉

But this is just me picking at little things, and it didn’t really decrease my enjoyment of the story.

Writing {4/5}:

Could have used a little polishing here and there, but it was overall good. Still, it was too long for my taste. I wish it could be shortened a bit. There could have been less explanation about every little thing.

Content {3/5}:

No language. Mild violence (including someone almost getting choked and then a lot of talk about cyanide gas being used to kill a lot of people). Disturbing stuff, such a religion/anything religious (e.g. praying, using the word ‘God,’ etc.) being banned and people who do these things being sent to ‘the Island’ and then those people being scheduled for termination (with cyanide gas). One kiss towards the end, not-detailed, and some (barely noticeable, never a big part of the plot at all) romancey stuff.

Overall {5/5}:

This is one of those books that I’ll probably reread at some point, that I won’t delete from my Kindle, and that I’ll recommend to my friends. I’m hoping the author will come out with a sequel … and if not, I’d be excited to read something new by Mr. Davidson, anyway!


About the Author

William Michael Davidson lives in Long Beach, California with his wife and two daughters. A believer that “good living produces good writing,” Davidson writes early in the morning so he can get outside, exercise, spend time with people, and experience as much as possible.

A writer of speculative fiction, he enjoys stories that deal with humanity’s inherent need for redemption.

For more on Davidson and his writing, connect with him on Goodreads, Twitter, Facebook, and Amazon Author’s Page.


There is also a giveaway for two print copies that are available to those living in the U.S. only and one eBook copy available international. The giveaway will end at 12 a.m. (EST) on Sunday, Feb. 26. Enter to win now!

You can find the schedule to read the rest of the posts of this amazing blog tour here.

~Kellyn Roth

The Mirror by John A. Heldt

Title: The Mirror

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: Northwest Passage, #5

Genre: Science Fiction (time-travel) Romance

Age-Range: 15+ (upper young adult/adult)

Era: futuristic (2020) and 1960s

Setting: Seattle, Washington

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: author (in exchange for honest review)

Rating: 4/5 stars

Content: 4/5. A star was removed for content. No violence (though mentions of protests, the Civil Rights movement, and such). People are mean to a character because he’s black. Some cussing here and there – not very frequent. Mentions of birth control pills and that kind of thing (I think a mention of condoms, too? Ew …). A girl gets pregnant out of wedlock. Lots of kissing and mentions of kissing and mentions of sex, too. The word for those girls is promiscuous. But by 2020, I imagine that’s gonna be even more socially accepted, so … 😉 Just kidding. But seriously, though, not recommended to younger teens at all. Caution prescribed for older teens.

The Mirror by John A. Heldt

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On September 11, 2020, Ginny and Katie Smith celebrate their nineteenth birthday at a country fair near Seattle. Ignoring the warnings of a fortune-teller, they enter a house of mirrors and exit in May 1964. Armed with the knowledge they need to return to their time, they try to make the most of what they believe will be a four-month vacation.

But their sixties adventure becomes complicated when they meet a revered great-grandmother and fall in love with local boys. In THE MIRROR, the sequel to THE MINE and THE SHOW, the sisters find happiness and heartbreak as they confront unexpected challenges and gut-wrenching choices in the age of civil rights, the Beatles, and Vietnam.

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Again, a kind of short review I’m afraid to say. I should probably have set this one aside for a while because it’s a meaty book and I don’t want to forget anything, but I don’t want to make the author wait any longer, and this is what I have time for now. 🙂

This was a really great book! I enjoyed it from cover to cover. The only downside was the content. Lots of sex out of marriage, even if it wasn’t detailed. Didn’t care for that at all. However, if you can skim through that and pretend it didn’t happen (which I did), it is amazing.

I don’t read a lot of books set during this time period. I don’t know a ton about the Civil Rights movement. I’m not going to be studying it until … hmm, probably year after next year. And I’m sick of hearing about racism, frankly. I admit it might be a very real problem … but I feel like people make way too big a deal about it nowadays. However, back then racism was definitely a big thing, and this seemed an accurate, unbiased portrayal of the times.

I didn’t realize the Beatles were that big a deal! I like the Beatles, sure, they’re great … but the level of obsession! I had no idea. That was cool. 😀

Can we take a minute to appreciate James and Mike? Both great guys, both swell characters, and both with some serious problems on their hands! And James’s mom … gosh. Mike’s mom wasn’t bad, either, but James’s mom was my favorite. So much fun!

I really liked all the characters (that I was supposed to like, anyway … and even the bad guys were well-done!) though, like I said, Ginny and Katie (which surprised me! Katie!) both acted inappropriately by my standards. Even by the world’s standards, they were acting pretty dangerously (as evidenced by the … plot twist … at the end of the book).

Virginia … well, I can’t get enough of this girl. 🙂 She was fun as a young woman, and as a middle-aged woman she’s no less fun!

The subplot with Mike and Katie and Mike’s ancestors and all that … that was fantastic. I was a little confused in places, but for the most part, I loved it.

The ending was a little sad, but that was how it had to be … I know that. Still … sad. 😩

Overall, this was a great book for adults and upper young adults. It’s really great, and I enjoyed it so much! Looking for more books like this one by John A. Heldt in the future!

~Kellyn Roth

The Show by John A. Heldt

Title: The Show

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: Northwest Passage, #3

Genre: Science Fiction Romance (time travel)

Age-Range: 14+ (young adult/adult)

Era: 1940s (WW2), contemporary, and 1918 (post-WW1)

Setting: London, England

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: author (in exchange for an honest review)

Rating: 3/5 stars

Content: 3/5. Some language (just a few times, though). Little/no violence (though mention of wars, etc.). Kisses (somewhat detailed), mentions of pregnancy. There’s a scene on Joel and Grace’s wedding night which I skipped and therefore couldn’t tell you about. So … no idea what went on there. *coughs* And then … Grace kinda gives her mother ‘the talk.’ I skimmed this as well, but I didn’t see anything explicit.

The Show by John A. Heldt

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Seattle, 1941.

Grace Vandenberg, 21, is having a bad day. Minutes after Pearl Harbor is attacked, she learns that her boyfriend is a time traveler from 2000 who has abandoned her for a future he insists they cannot share. Determined to save their love, she follows him into the new century. But just when happiness is within her grasp, she accidentally enters a second time portal and exits in 1918.

Distraught and heartbroken, Grace starts a new life in the age of Woodrow Wilson, silent movies, and the Spanish flu.

She meets her parents as young, single adults and befriends a handsome, wounded Army captain just back from the war. In THE SHOW, the sequel to THE MINE, Grace finds love and friendship in the ashes of tragedy as she endures the trial of her life.

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This was a somewhat disappointing novel, mostly because of Grace’s actions in 1918. I was especially confused by her actions towards the end regarding her parents. I didn’t get how that could be possible until the way time travel works in these books was explained in The Mirror. Now that I understand that, however, I’m able to understand this novel much better.

I must say, I loved Grace’s parents as teens. They were amusing, especially her mother. I had no idea ‘Mrs. Vandenburg’ was such a kick as a kid!

I also found it difficult to believe that Grace got over Joel that quickly. Joel was her everything. Sure, she needed to move on … but she was married to him regardless of differences in time and space. Moving on doesn’t necessarily have to involve another man, okay?

I found the whole idea of the theater interesting. Very cool concept. One of the best things about this story other than seeing Grace and Joel again, hearing Grace’s side of the story, etc.

I’m not going to go on more (because I had rating less than four stars … even though three stars is honestly a decent rating …). I’ll just say that this is a good story, but not quite as good as some of Heldt’s others.

~Kellyn Roth

Class of ’59 by John A. Heldt

Title: Class of ’59

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: American Journey, #4 (can be a stand-alone, too)

Genre: Time Travel Adventure/Romance

Age-Range: 14+ (young adult/adult)

Era: contemporary and 1959

Setting: California

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: from author (in exchange for honest review)

Rating: 4/5 stars (.5 removed for content)

Content: 3/5. A few cuss words, d**m a few times and I think maybe h**l once. Some violence (someone is shot with a gun, mentions of blood, nothing graphic at all). As far as sexual content … let’s just say we stayed out the bedroom, but there was some, er, extra-marital activities that weren’t described (past kisses and stuff). Fade-to-black, but we still know it happened and … yep. That’s why I don’t recommend it to anyone under 14. And then … there’s also a mention, when Mark is looking at the 2017 world, of couples of the same gender kissing … so yep. There’s that. Never mentioned again, though.

Class of ’59 by John A. Heldt

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When Mary Beth McIntire settles into a vacation house on June 2, 2017, she anticipates a quiet morning with coffee. Then she hears a noise, peers out a window, and spots a man in 1950s attire standing in the backyard. She panics when the trespasser sees her and enters the house though a door to the basement. She questions her sanity when she cannot find him.

In the same house on March 21, 1959, Mark Ryan finds a letter. Written by the mansion’s original owner in 1900, the letter describes a basement chamber, mysterious crystals, and a formula for time travel. Driven by curiosity, Mark tests the formula twice. On his second trip to 2017, he encounters a beautiful stranger. He meets the woman in the window.

Within hours, Mary Beth and Mark share their secret with her sister and his brother and begin a journey that takes them from the present day to the age of sock hops, drive-ins, and jukeboxes. In CLASS OF ’59, the fourth book in the American Journey series, four young adults find love, danger, and adventure as they navigate the corridors of time and experience Southern California in its storied prime.

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Well, that was great! I was a little worried that I wouldn’t like it because I always feel bad after giving a bad review … even if my last review of one of Mr. Heldt’s books wasn’t exactly bad, I had some bad things to say about the book. But I really enjoyed Class of ’59 (as you know if you’re my mother and scolded me in the morning for being up at two …).

Anyway, this book breaks the formula I was kinda starting to see in John A. Heldt books. For instance, we’re seeing the story for two couples’ perspectives … four people who are main characters instead of one. Very nice. Also, we’re seeing the time-traveling, originally, from someone living in the past’s perspective. Really neat. I liked that.

The plot was relatively well-paced and interesting. I enjoyed the setting a bit more than I thought I would (I found it really interesting, if a little … more modern than I’m used to, I suppose), and I was already thinking I’d like it a lot. Honestly, I don’t like to go much past the early ’50s in novels, so this was pushing it for me. But I really liked it. I especially enjoyed the descriptions of school in the late ’50s. And the tennis match … that was my favorite part. 🙂

For some reason I was envisioning a mixture of That Darn Cat, Grease, and my grandma’s young adulthood in my head the whole time I was reading this book. It was pleasant (and a little annoying, because THE GREASE SOUNDTRACK AAAH SHOOT ME BEFORE I HEAR GREASED LIGHTNING RUNNING THROUGH MY HEAD ONE MORE TIME!!!), and I’m glad I read it.

Now, the content was a little more than I prefer, but I managed to switch my mind to ‘Okay, I’m watching my grandma’s young adulthood Grease at the moment, and I need to try ignore the content because my grandfather Olivia Newton-John is awesome cute …’ and fast-forward during those parts. 😉

The characters were interesting and unique. I think my favorite was Mary Beth. Or Piper. Definitely Piper. Wait,  I like Ben, too. And Sally …

Which reminds me; not finding out about Sally was one of the  reasons (other than content and the fact that it made me stay up too late XD ) I didn’t give this novel 5 stars. How do I know how she ends up?

So, if you’re an older teen/adult (see content section) and you love time-travel romances with a generous dash of adventure, grab a copy of Class of ’59, John A. Heldt’s most recent (September, to be exact) release today!

~Kellyn Roth

The Fire by John A. Heldt

Title: The Fire

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: Northwest Passage, #4

Genre: Time Travel Adventure/Romance

Age-Range: 13+ (upper young adult/adult)

Era: 2000s/1910s (Contemporary/Edwardian)

Setting: Northwest America

Publisher: John A. Heldt (self-published)

Source: from author (in exchange for honest review)

Rating: 3/5 stars

Content: 3/5, not recommended for anyone under thirteen. Mild language, only occasionally. Some violence/death/thematic elements, but nothing gory or frightening. (SPOILERS NOW) I expected there to be another out-of-marriage sex scene, but there was more description this time (it was very no-details and fade-to-black in the last two books I read by Mr. Heldt, and although it wasn’t very detailed and it didn’t go too far … still not a fan). I was disappointed. Also, they didn’t get married, although they would have if they could have. There were also several mentions of visits to prostitutes, and one of the main characters would have become a prostitute, but she was rescued before she actually … *awkwardness* (END OF SPOILERS)

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