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The Remnant by William Michael Davidson

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Today I’m taking a break from the blog tour of The New Diary to participate in the blog tour of The Remnant by William Michael Davidson. This tour is being hosted by MC Blog Tours.

Onto the review!

Title: The Remnant

Author: William Michael Davidson

Genre: Christian Dystopian/Science Fiction

Setting: Semi-futuristic United States

Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press

Source: from author (in exchange for honest review)

Overall Rating: 5/5 stars

The Remnant by William Michael Davidson

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Colton Pierce apprehends Abberants—those who display symptoms of faith—and quarantines them on a remote island to ensure public safety.  Years prior, the government released a genetically-engineered super flu that destroyed the genes believed to be the biological source of spiritual experience in an effort to rid the world of terrorism. As an extractor with the Center for Theological Control, Colton is dedicated to the cause.

          But Colton’s steadfast commitment is challenged when he learns his own son has been targeted for extraction. An underground militia, the Remnant, agrees to help Colton save his son in exchange for his assistance with their plan to free the Aberrants on the island.

Colton is faced with the most important decision of his life. Remain faithful to the CTC? Or give up everything to save his son?

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I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect when I started reading this book. I was a little wary, as I’ve never read a novel like this before. Of course, it is pretty original, so I’d probably be hard-pressed to find another book like it.

I loved it (and you can see by my rating), and I’d definitely recommend to anyone … even people who, like myself, are skeptical of this genre.

Plot {4/5}:

I removed one point because it got off to a slow start. I was hardly able to make my way through part one. However, after that, it quickly sped up and became, well, amazing. My favorite scene was in the Mourning Room when Selma talked to Colton. I also enjoyed everything about downloading the virus, because I find that idea intriguing, and also when Selma tells Colton about ‘Gus.’

Characters {5/5}:

The characters were all vividly portrayed and easy to keep track of. I especially liked Selma and Colton (more specifically, them together – they made a great team, honestly).

Selma was a unique, interesting individual. She’s intriguing, and she stands up for herself while still being womanly.

Colton is a pretty cool guy. I totally got his motivations and understood why he did what he did. I also sympathize with him about Marty. Though I’m good with kids (unlike Colton …), I can’t stand signs of weakness. It just bugs me. I’m like, “So what if you fell down and broke your arm? Get up!”

Ashton deserves to die. Hopefully there will be a sequel featuring the tragic death of one Ashton. 😉 Seriously, though, I hate him sooo much!

And ‘Gus’ was amazing, of course. 😛

Setting {3/5}:

Probably the weakest part of the book. Although it is futuristic, not a lot has changed. Sure, there are some technological advancements (such as the ability to, you know, plant a chip in someone’s head and keep tabs on them …), but the characters in this book use the same cars we do (albeit battery-operated) and not many social changes seem to have taken place.

For instance, Colton mentally refers to Ashton as feminine. Would they really even care enough to point that out in the post-2060 world? I don’t think so. It’s all going downhill, especially if religion is banned! 😉

But this is just me picking at little things, and it didn’t really decrease my enjoyment of the story.

Writing {4/5}:

Could have used a little polishing here and there, but it was overall good. Still, it was too long for my taste. I wish it could be shortened a bit. There could have been less explanation about every little thing.

Content {3/5}:

No language. Mild violence (including someone almost getting choked and then a lot of talk about cyanide gas being used to kill a lot of people). Disturbing stuff, such a religion/anything religious (e.g. praying, using the word ‘God,’ etc.) being banned and people who do these things being sent to ‘the Island’ and then those people being scheduled for termination (with cyanide gas). One kiss towards the end, not-detailed, and some (barely noticeable, never a big part of the plot at all) romancey stuff.

Overall {5/5}:

This is one of those books that I’ll probably reread at some point, that I won’t delete from my Kindle, and that I’ll recommend to my friends. I’m hoping the author will come out with a sequel … and if not, I’d be excited to read something new by Mr. Davidson, anyway!


About the Author

William Michael Davidson lives in Long Beach, California with his wife and two daughters. A believer that “good living produces good writing,” Davidson writes early in the morning so he can get outside, exercise, spend time with people, and experience as much as possible.

A writer of speculative fiction, he enjoys stories that deal with humanity’s inherent need for redemption.

For more on Davidson and his writing, connect with him on Goodreads, Twitter, Facebook, and Amazon Author’s Page.


There is also a giveaway for two print copies that are available to those living in the U.S. only and one eBook copy available international. The giveaway will end at 12 a.m. (EST) on Sunday, Feb. 26. Enter to win now!

You can find the schedule to read the rest of the posts of this amazing blog tour here.

~Kellyn Roth

The Mirror by John A. Heldt

Title: The Mirror

Author: John A. Heldt

Series: Northwest Passage, #5

Genre: Science Fiction (time-travel) Romance

Age-Range: 15+ (upper young adult/adult)

Era: futuristic (2020) and 1960s

Setting: Seattle, Washington

Publisher: John A. Heldt

Source: author (in exchange for honest review)

Rating: 4/5 stars

Content: 4/5. A star was removed for content. No violence (though mentions of protests, the Civil Rights movement, and such). People are mean to a character because he’s black. Some cussing here and there – not very frequent. Mentions of birth control pills and that kind of thing (I think a mention of condoms, too? Ew …). A girl gets pregnant out of wedlock. Lots of kissing and mentions of kissing and mentions of sex, too. The word for those girls is promiscuous. But by 2020, I imagine that’s gonna be even more socially accepted, so … 😉 Just kidding. But seriously, though, not recommended to younger teens at all. Caution prescribed for older teens.

The Mirror by John A. Heldt

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On September 11, 2020, Ginny and Katie Smith celebrate their nineteenth birthday at a country fair near Seattle. Ignoring the warnings of a fortune-teller, they enter a house of mirrors and exit in May 1964. Armed with the knowledge they need to return to their time, they try to make the most of what they believe will be a four-month vacation.

But their sixties adventure becomes complicated when they meet a revered great-grandmother and fall in love with local boys. In THE MIRROR, the sequel to THE MINE and THE SHOW, the sisters find happiness and heartbreak as they confront unexpected challenges and gut-wrenching choices in the age of civil rights, the Beatles, and Vietnam.

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Again, a kind of short review I’m afraid to say. I should probably have set this one aside for a while because it’s a meaty book and I don’t want to forget anything, but I don’t want to make the author wait any longer, and this is what I have time for now. 🙂

This was a really great book! I enjoyed it from cover to cover. The only downside was the content. Lots of sex out of marriage, even if it wasn’t detailed. Didn’t care for that at all. However, if you can skim through that and pretend it didn’t happen (which I did), it is amazing.

I don’t read a lot of books set during this time period. I don’t know a ton about the Civil Rights movement. I’m not going to be studying it until … hmm, probably year after next year. And I’m sick of hearing about racism, frankly. I admit it might be a very real problem … but I feel like people make way too big a deal about it nowadays. However, back then racism was definitely a big thing, and this seemed an accurate, unbiased portrayal of the times.

I didn’t realize the Beatles were that big a deal! I like the Beatles, sure, they’re great … but the level of obsession! I had no idea. That was cool. 😀

Can we take a minute to appreciate James and Mike? Both great guys, both swell characters, and both with some serious problems on their hands! And James’s mom … gosh. Mike’s mom wasn’t bad, either, but James’s mom was my favorite. So much fun!

I really liked all the characters (that I was supposed to like, anyway … and even the bad guys were well-done!) though, like I said, Ginny and Katie (which surprised me! Katie!) both acted inappropriately by my standards. Even by the world’s standards, they were acting pretty dangerously (as evidenced by the … plot twist … at the end of the book).

Virginia … well, I can’t get enough of this girl. 🙂 She was fun as a young woman, and as a middle-aged woman she’s no less fun!

The subplot with Mike and Katie and Mike’s ancestors and all that … that was fantastic. I was a little confused in places, but for the most part, I loved it.

The ending was a little sad, but that was how it had to be … I know that. Still … sad. 😦

Overall, this was a great book for adults and upper young adults. It’s really great, and I enjoyed it so much! Looking for more books like this one by John A. Heldt in the future!

~Kellyn Roth

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Title: The Hunger Games

Author: Suzanne Collins (http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/)

Series: The Hunger Games, #1

Genre: Dystopian

Age-Range: Young Adult

Setting: Panem, futuristic USA

Publisher: Scholastic Press

Source: loan from friend

Rating: 4/5 stars. Though I loved the book, it wasn’t my favorite ever.

Content: 3/5. Mostly violence. It didn’t bother me (old iron sides …) at all, but it probably would disturb some people … a lot.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

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Winning will make you famous. Losing means certain death.

The nation of Panem, formed from a post-apocalyptic North America, is a country that consists of a wealthy Capitol region surrounded by 12 poorer districts. Early in its history, a rebellion led by a 13th district against the Capitol resulted in its destruction and the creation of an annual televised event known as the Hunger Games. In punishment, and as a reminder of the power and grace of the Capitol, each district must yield one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 through a lottery system to participate in the games. The ‘tributes’ are chosen during the annual Reaping and are forced to fight to the death, leaving only one survivor to claim victory.

When 16-year-old Katniss’s young sister, Prim, is selected as District 12’s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart Peeta, are pitted against bigger, stronger representatives, some of whom have trained for this their whole lives. , she sees it as a death sentence. But Katniss has been close to death before. For her, survival is second nature.

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